Romania Animal Rescue, Inc.
neuter or spay--no more strays
CFC
OIPA
Stray AFP
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Of the 1,000,000 charities operating in the United States today, it is estimated that fewer than 50,000 (5%) meet or exceed these standards, and of those, fewer than 2,000 have been awarded this Seal. Read more...
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The Problem

Why Romania?

Why Romania?

Just a little background about the plight of stray dogs in Romania: In recent months, there has been a huge campaign implemented in Romania to exterminate all stray dogs. Romania, like many Eastern block countries, has a rather large population of street dogs. These dogs are the by-product of communist rule--when families relinquished their pets and released them to the streets when they were forced out of their homes. Unfortunately, over the years, the dogs have become regarded as "vermin" by a large portion of the Romanian population--a mentality that has recently been aggressively reinforced by the Romanian media following the death of a 4-year-old boy--allegedly by a pack of stray dogs. There remains deep controversy regarding the truth behind the allegations. Some reports state that the boy was under the care of his grandmother at the time, and he was missing for quite a while before the grandmother decided to look for him. His body was found almost an hour away (by foot) in a fenced area, where some stray dogs lived in an abandoned building. The strays in that area were killed, and ironically, the boy's body showed no trace of the dogs' DNA. So, who knows how the boy really died. It was a tragedy for which ALL the strays of Romania are now blamed. Furthermore, the public shelters are poorly equipped and many are run by corrupt officials. The dogs die horrific deaths and many of them are tortured before they finally succumb. There is no such thing as peaceful "euthanasia" for the dogs in the shelters of Romania. Some shelters even fail to separate males and females, and allow the dogs to continue procreating. Many dogs in these shelters shut down, become aggressive, and even become cannibalistic due to the lack of food and space.

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Overview

Overview

During the Communist regime of Nicolai Ceausescu, farmers were forced to move from their villages to Communist bloc housing in the city and to work in factories. He did not allow cats and dogs in public housing, so many were abandoned. Though Communism fell in 1989, the number of homeless cats and dogs living in cities and towns has reached crisis level. Stray dogs and cats wander the streets of Romania, searching for food and shelter. Cars hit many of them. They all risk poisoning, illness and starvation. Those animals placed in shelters are fed scraps, if they are lucky.

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Simple Economics...Or Is It?

Simple Economics...Or Is It?

Romania underwent a short-lived period of economic stability in the 1960s and 1970s during the early part of Nicolae Ceausescu's regime. In 1981, Ceausescu instituted an austerity program that resulted in severe shortages of food, electricity and consumer goods. In 1989, after antigovernment violence broke out, Ceausescu fled, but was captured, deposed and executed along with his wife. A 2006 presidential commission report estimated that under Communist rule (1945-1989) as many as 2 million people were killed or persecuted in Romania. The economy continued to lag under the 1990 presidential election of Ion Iliescu, a former Communist party official. Price increases and food shortages led to civil unrest, and the closing of mines set off large-scale strikes and demonstrations by miners. In the 2000 elections, Iliescu again won the presidency. It was during his presidency that stray dogs and cats of Romania began to multiply in great numbers. Before Communism, Romanians enjoyed a good relationship with their animals. Seen more as workers than pets, they shared their lives with many families in rural villages and were well cared for and never hungry. Dogs herded sheep and cattle, and cats hunted their food. During the Communist era, family planning was not allowed. Romanians took desperate measures to prevent the births of more children. Some had to abandon their newborn babies who ended up in government run orphanages. Most families from rural villages were forced to move to cities, housed in crowded Communist bloc apartments, some with other families. Ordered by Ceausescu to leave their dogs and cats on the city streets, no animals were allowed in the small apartments.

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